UPDATE 9 May 2013:  Roozendaal resigns.  NSW Treasurer Eric Roozendaal seen here with Sydney Ports CEO Grant Gilfillan officially opening the Port Botany Boat Ramp and pedestrian overpass today.  There was a small gathering of officials and a handful of community members. The treasurer was there for 20 minutes and didn’t stay for the tour or morning tea.  Botany Council was represented by its Deputy Mayor.  Randwick Council was not represented. The local state MP, Michael Daley,  was absent as were the pelicans, once a major feature of the port area (seen here at Penryhn Estuary).  Greg Killeen, Banksmeadow resident and former Secretary of Save Botany Beach, is pictured on the new bridge.  Greg was not invited to the opening so didn’t get a chance to ask Minister Roozendaal why there have been no mitigation measures (eg. sound walls, double glazing)  for the local residents negatively affected by the port expansion.  $3 million was found for a gymnasium for a school in  Premier Keneally’s electorate located well away from the Port, but nothing for those only a few hundred metres away.

In the Sydney Ports media release Eric Roozendaal is quoted as saying that Foreshore Beach has been ‘upgraded’.  For the record the following photographs record the previous Foreshore Beach and Penrhyn Estuary and Spit.  Activities no longer possible include fishing off the jetty, windsurfing, kayaking, beachcombing.

Link to Sydney Ports Video (taken August 2010)   SYDNEY PORTS MEDIA RELEASE:

NSW Treasurer and Minister for Ports and Waterways Eric Roozendaal today officially handed over $30 million in new and upgraded Port Botany foreshore community infrastructure facilities to local residents and community groups.

“The $1 billion Port Botany expansion will play a vital role in facilitating import and export trade for the whole of NSW,” Mr Roozendaal said.

“Port Botany is the backbone of our $400 billion state economy but it was also important, as part of this expansion, to invest in and support the local neighbouring communities.

“That is why within the $1 billion expansion the NSW Government committed $30 million to upgrade facilities for the communities and residents around Port Botany.”

Mr Roozendaal said careful planning and consultation with the local community had contributed towards major new community infrastructure, including:

 

• The new Port Botany Boat Ramp;

• Foreshore Road Pedestrian Bridge;

• Mill Stream Lookout; and

• An upgraded Foreshore Beach.

 

Foreshore Beach, at the northern part of Botany Bay has undergone a restoration program to ensure the community can return to enjoying the local foreshore area.

The new foreshore area includes 2 km of shared pedestrian/bicycle pathway linked to Sir Joseph Banks Park, 82 solar lights along the length of the path while Foreshore Beach dune areas have been enhanced with new native vegetation plantings.

“The new four-lane Port Botany Boat Ramp includes two floating pontoons, viewing platform, enclosed fish cleaning facility and boat engine washing facilities using recycled water.

The Foreshore Road Pedestrian Bridge provides the local Botany community with safe access between Sir Joseph Banks Park and the Port Botany foreshore.

Further towards the airport, the Mill Stream Lookout, complete with 31 car spaces, provides plane and crane spotters with the best view of an operating port precinct as well as direct views of aircraft using the third runway at Sydney Airport.

“Port Botany is the busiest port in NSW – last year about $50 billion of trade passed through the port,” Mr Roozendaal said.

“These new facilities allow the local community to benefit from the success and growth of the port.”

 

2 Responses to “Roozendaal opens Port Botany Boat Ramp”
  1. mario martins says:

    IS the recyclable water on this new ramp ok for cleaning outboards? I was told that it is full of sulpher and salt

  2. John says:

    There was no provision for a wash down or fish cleaning facility in the original approved development plan. It was only after years of consistent niggling of SPC management and the succession of Ports Ministers that we got what we currently have. Not exactly perfect but better than nothing.

    The water source for the boat wash down area is regretably not the mains supply but recycled surface water. It is supposed to be filtered before use but the reality is that the quality of the water is often poor and has a higher than normal salt content. This is very likely due to the fact that when a boat is washed down there is a level of saltwater contamination that flows down the drain into the water holding tank. Likewise there is a build up of salt on the concrete apron which then washes into the drain whenever it rains.While there is a level of salt contamination it is not what I would regard as a problem level. I don’t know anything about sulpher contamination and cannot see where this would be sourced from.

    The water is ok for a general wash down of boat and trailer and flush of motors. The members of our club use it all the time with no apparent problems.I have raised concerns about the water quality with Shane Hobday a couple of times and on one occasion challenged Shane to have a taste of the water as I had just done. On that occasion the water was mildly salty to taste but that was after a dry spell. Shane organised for the tank to be drained and topped up with clean water.

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